2018 Was A Big Year

Holiday Card

2018 has been one of our most successful years so far!  We are so proud of what we have accomplished and continue to be humbled by the support we receive from on sustaining donors and from those who provide an annual gift.  I hope this list of accomplishments will inspire and excite you as we move into 2019 and celebrate of our 10th anniversary!

  • Authored Assembly Bill 2504 To Provide LGBT Awareness Training For 90,000 California Law Enforcement Officers And 9-1-1 Dispatchers.  The Bill Was Signed Into Law By Governor Brown And Is Effective January 1, 2019.
  • Created A California Version Of Our Highly Successful Online LGBT Awareness For Law Enforcement Course.  We Partnered With The Napa Valley Criminal Justice Training Center And Obtained Califonria P.O.S.T. Certification.  We Completed A Successful Pilot Presentation And Received Very Positive Results.
  • Authored A Training For Trainers Instructor Guide For The LGBT Awareness For Law Enforcement Course And A Training For Trainers Class That Will Be Offered In Early 2019.
  • To Date, Members Of 39 Different Law Enforcement Agencies From Across The United States Have Taken Our Online LGBT Awareness For Law Enforcement Course.  Two Departments Had Us Create Customized Courses For Their Entire Department.
  • We Awarded One Out To Protect Scholarship And One Library Grant In 2018.
  • Our Out To Protect And Coming Out From Behind The Badge Online Resources Are Now Consolidated Into One Website With All Information And Funding Programs Available In One Space.

Our Goals For 2019

  • Secure Funding For An LGBT Law Enforcement Training Conference.
  • Provide LGBT Awareness Training For Any Law Enforcement Agency Desiring It In The United States.
  • Seek Out Two LGBTQ Role Models Pursuing A Law Enforcement Career And Support Them With A Scholarship.

You can help us celebrate our first decade of service and to realize our goals in 2019 by becoming a donor.  A monthly contribution of any amount helps.  No amount is too small to make a big difference.  Thank you for considering a donation to Out To Protect.   Click Here To Donate.

Greg Miraglia, Founder and CEO
Out To Protect Inc

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LGBT Awareness For California Law Enforcement

Out To Protect Partners With The
Napa Valley College Criminal Justice Training Center
LGBT Awareness For California Law Enforcement Online Course

LGBT Awareness For California Law Enforcement

We are pleased to announce the launch of our LGBT Awareness For California Law Enforcement online course in partnership with the Napa Valley College Criminal Justice Training Center!  This new online course meets the requirements of California Penal Code Section 13519.41, which specifies training for California peace officers and dispatchers on a variety of LGBTQ related issues.  This new course is certified to the Napa Valley Criminal Justice Training Center by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.  Participants receive 4 hours of CPT credit.

Law enforcement personnel can enter and complete the course at any time while the course is available.  Participants who pass the course will receive a course completion certificate.  The course can be started and stopped as needed.  Participants can complete course work from any computer or mobile device with Internet access.  The course is hosted on the Canvas learning management system and no special software is required.  (The free Canvas mobile app is required to access to course on a mobile pad or phone).

The LGBT Awareness For California Law Enforcement course includes the following five learning outcomes:

  • Explain the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity and how they relate to and intersect with race, religion, and culture.
  • Define terminology used to describe sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • Identify key moments in the LGBTQ+ civil rights movement.
  • Identify ways to create an inclusive workplace and to support LGBTQ+ co-workers.
  • Describe how hate crimes and domestic violence impact the LGBTQ+ community.

The cost of the course is $28.16.  Registration can be completed online 24/7.  Fees are non-refundable.  Once registered, students will receive access to the course and can being training immediately.  Training managers can register students and provide access to employees as needed.

The Napa Valley College Criminal Justice Training Center is also offering face-to-face versions of this training onsite at Calfornia law enforcement agencies.  The cost of the course is dependent on travel costs.  For more information, please call the trianing center at 707-256-7700.

A training for trainers course is also being developed for agencies wishing to have their own in-house trainers.  Participants in this trianing for trainers will receive a complete training package that includes course outlines, lesson plans, PowerPoints, and learning activities.  We will send out another notification once the date is set for this 8-hour course.

Learn More:

Click Here To Download A Course Flier For The Online LGBT Awareness For California Law Enforcement course

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LGBT Awareness Training Comes To California


Today, California Governor Jerry Brown made history by enacting the first state law to provide LGBTQ awareness training for law enforcement officers and dispatchers.  Effective January 1, 2019, section 13519.41 will be added to the California Penal Code as follows:

Section 13519.41

(a) The commission shall develop and implement a course of training regarding sexual orientation and gender identity minority groups in this state. In developing the training, the commission shall consult with sexual orientation and gender identity minority members of law enforcement and the community who have expertise in the area of sexual orientation and gender identity, including at least one male, one female, and one transgender person.
(b) The course of training for officers and dispatchers described in subdivision (a) shall be incorporated into the course or courses of basic training for law enforcement officers and dispatchers and shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
(1) The difference between sexual orientation and gender identity and how these two aspects of identity relate to each other and to race, culture, and religion.
(2) The terminology used to identify and describe sexual orientation and gender identity.
(3) How to create an inclusive workplace within law enforcement for sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.
(4) Important moments in history related to sexual orientation and gender identity minorities and law enforcement.
(5) How law enforcement can respond effectively to domestic violence and hate crimes involving sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.
(c) Law enforcement officers, administrators, executives, and dispatchers may participate in supplementary training that includes all of the topics described in this section. The supplementary training shall fulfill the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training requirements for continuing professional training and shall include facilitated discussions and learning activities, including scenario training exercises. Additional training courses to update this instruction shall be established as deemed necessary by the commission.

In anticipation of the passage of this law, we have created course curriculum that can be delivered in a face-to-face or online format.  Both formats of the course have been certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) through the Napa Valley College Criminal Justice Training Center.  We will be working with the San Jose Police Department and Napa Valley Criminal Justice Training Center to provide a training for trainers in order to make this curriculum available to any agency wishing to use it.

We are grateful to Assembly Member Evan Low, who sponsored this bill, and to Governor Brown for signing it.  We were honored to be part of the writing of this Bill.  We believe this training will give law enforcement the culture competence necessary to better service members of the LGBTQ community, including all sexual orientation and gender identity minority residents of California.

We strongly encourage law enforcement executives and training managers to begin providing this training immediately.  To learn more about the offerings of this training, go to www.nvccjtc.org and select Advanced Officer Training.

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Spring 2018 Scholarship Recipient

John Corsi has spent his life working to serve and help others in need. After high school he began attending college and worked as a consultant focusing on security issues and investigations. After working overseas he took a management position in a program where he worked extensively with American law enforcement officers. He was impressed with the passion, dedication, and professionalism that seemed to be universal among them. The impression he was left with led him to make a career change; wanting to go where he could be surrounded by people with those same values and ethics he chose local law enforcement. Seeing this as a new opportunity to serve and help those in need, he started with the Norfolk Police Department’s Basic Law Enforcement Academy in June 2017, continuing training until a Defensive Tactics injury left him unable to train further. Following surgery John was detailed to units of the Norfolk Police Department where he could support the department’s operations while completing physical therapy. After a rapid recovery and with the overwhelming support of his Academy instructors, John returned to the next session of Norfolk’s Basic Law Enforcement Academy. John served as a leader in the class and completed the Academy with high rankings for marksmanship and academics, graduating on July 5, 2018. He is proud to be one of many gay men who make up the larger LGBT community within his department and his city.  He knows the calling of law enforcement will allow him to help others and serve his community, but he also knows it will give him a unique opportunity to connect with and support the LGBT people of his city.

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The Case For Mandated Training

Introduction

The California State Legislature is currently considering a bill that will require LGBT awareness training for law enforcement officers and dispatchers.  The proposed bill will add a section to other similar requirements included in section 13519 of the California Penal Code.  Over the years, the Legislature has put into law requirements for law enforcement to be trained on a variety of topics that many would consider to be common sense training needs.  Vehicle pursuits, domestic violence, and workplace harassment prevention, are just a few of the training topics one might assume law enforcement would have taken the initiative to provide training on its own, but alas, the profession did not until it was required.  Such is the case for training about sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.  While reasoning for this training might seem obvious, the following is the case and reasoning for why this training needs to be required across the country in every state.

The bill being proposed will require training for law enforcement officers at all levels of the organization, including chiefs and sheriffs, and dispatchers to address at a minimum the following five topics.

  1. The difference between sexual orientation and gender identity and how these two aspects of identity relate to each other and to race, culture and religion.
  2. The terminology used to identify and describe sexual orientation and gender identity.
  3. How create an inclusive workplace within law enforcement for sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.
  4. Major moments in history related to sexual orientation, gender identity minorities and law enforcement.
  5. How law enforcement can respond effectively to domestic violence and hate crimes involving sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.

The California Commission on Peace Officer Standards (POST) is the agency responsible for establishing minimum hiring standards and training requirements for law enforcement officers and dispatchers.  POST has established required curriculum for all of the 39 regional law enforcement training centers that deliver the Basic Law Enforcement Course (basic academy) and Basic Dispatch Course.  POST is responsible for 96,037 law enforcement officers and dispatchers (full time peace officers, reserve officers, and dispatchers) that work at over 500 different law enforcement agencies throughout the state.

New law enforcement officers and dispatchers currently receive training on cultural diversity and workplace harassment prevention in required basic training programs (basic academies courses).  Law enforcement officers also receive training on response to domestic violence and hate crimes.  The existing required curriculum includes minimal mention of sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.  In fact, the California POST Training and Testing Specifications for the basic police academy learning domain 42, which includes cultural diversity, there is no mention at all of sexual orientation or gender identity.  The inclusion of these subjects is left to the discretion of the 39 individual training academies.  The student workbook for learning domain 42 does make minimal mention of LGBT co-workers, but it does not come close to effectively addressing the five topics described above. There is also minimal mention of sexual orientation and gender identity minorities in domestic violence and hate crimes investigations.  It’s also clear, based on the studies to be mentioned below and recent hate crime statistics that existing training requirements have been ineffective in preventing incidents of workplace harassment and discrimination and incidents of domestic violence and hate crimes impacting LGBTQ+ people in the community.

Sources Of Information

The University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Williams Institute has studied sexual orientation and gender identity minority conditions in society and in the workforce since 2001.  They have published many studies applicable to this topic including two recent specific studies about sexual orientation and gender identity minorities in law enforcement.  The 2013 study looked at how sexual orientation and gender identity minorities are treated within law enforcement.  In 2015, the Williams Institute published a study about how law enforcement relates to the greater and external LGBTQ+ community.  In both of these studies, researchers concluded that “Discrimination and harassment by law enforcement based on sexual orientation and gender identity is an ongoing and pervasive problem in LGBT communities.”  The Williams Institute also found that of all the different types of municipal workplaces, such as public works, education, fire departments, and law enforcement, the law enforcement workplace is one of the most common places where complaints of workplace harassment and discrimination arise.

Each law enforcement agency has its own leadership and management structure functioning within the same system of laws, but functions independently within a local system of governance.  The culture of these agencies varies greatly and the training law enforcement employees receive beyond the minimums required by POST vary greatly as well.  Within the scope of sexual orientation and gender identity minorities, there are programs in San Francisco, Napa, and Los Angeles, just to name a few, that are robust and inclusive already of what this bill proposes, but these programs are few and far between.  The legal requirements of this bill will insure all 96,037 law enforcement employees receive training to address the service disparities and workplace climate documented by the Williams Institute studies.

Reasoning For The Content

1. Sexual orientation and gender identity are two different aspects of who we are and are independent of any other aspect of identity, such as race and nationality.  Sexual orientation and gender identity minorities exist in every race, nationality, ethnicity, and community in California.  These two aspects of who we are transcend everything else.  This means that, no matter the demographics or geographic location in the state, sexual orientation and gender identity minorities exist.  These populations have been traditionally invisible and hidden and, of course, exist within the ranks of law enforcement as well.

It is also important for law enforcement officers and dispatchers to understand how sexual orientation and gender identity relate to race, culture and religious traditions as often these intersections are at the heart of domestic violence, hate violence, and youth homelessness.

2.  The language we use to describe sexual orientation and gender identity enable those in the minority to relate to the majority.  Law enforcement officers and dispatchers use terminology as part of descriptors of sexual orientation and gender identity in reports and in other forms of communication.  The use of proper terminology and context is critical to demonstrate respect and trust while interacting with and serving sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.

3.  The 2013 Williams Institute Study about the law enforcement workplace found that “employment discrimination and harassment based on sexual orientation and gender identity is an ongoing and pervasive problem in law enforcement and corrections departments.”  Millions of tax payer dollars are being paid out to settle unlawful harassment and discrimination cases occuring in California law enforcement agencies.  Organizational culture plays a large part in how sexual orientation and gender identity minorities are treated within the law enforcement workplace.  Law enforcement administrators and executives have a large role in establishing and changing organizational culture, so it is imperative that these individuals receive on how to create an inclusive workplace.  The training is equally important for line-level law enforcement officers and dispatchers since much of the harassment experienced by sexual orientation and gender identity minorities originates from peers.  According to the 2013 Williams Institute Study, “establishing a culture of acceptance in the police force and the surrounding community is likely to enhance workplace morale, improve community policing and increase overall safety.”

4.  Like many minority groups, law enforcement has a history of violence and confrontation with sexual orientation and gender identity minority groups.  From the early 20th century through the infamous “Stonewall Riots” of 1969, law enforcement has engaged in targeted enforcement of the community in ways that have created a climate of mistrust.  Though the relationship between law enforcement and the LGBTQ+ community has improved since 1969, the 2015 Williams Institute Study found that “LGBT individuals and communities face profiling, discrimination and harassment at the hands of law enforcement officers. Data from a wide range of sources show that such harassment and discrimination is greatest for LGBT people of color, transgender persons and youth.”

5.  Since marriage equality for same-sex couples became a reality nationwide in 2017, the UCLA Williams Institute reports that “as of June 2017, nearly 1.1 million LGBT people in the United States are married to someone of the same sex, implying that more than 547,000 same-sex couples are married nationwide.” California’s domestic violence laws recognize marriage as a relationship no matter where the marriage originates.  As more same-sex couples become visible, so will the incidents of domestic violence.  In fact, the rates of domestic violence in same-sex relationships is the same as it is in opposite-sex relationships (Center For American Progress).  Absent training, law enforcements officers and dispatchers receiving and responding to calls of domestic violence in same-sex relationships are likely to apply stereotypes and assumptions based on opposite-sex relationship norms.  A lack of training may even cause an officer to not recognize a domestic violence crime as having occurred between to combatants of the same gender.  Just as law enforcement receives specialized training on how to handle the sensitive nature of domestic violence calls as well as the legal requirements of such calls, law enforcement officers and dispatchers need training specific to sexual orientation and gender identity minorities who are involved in incidents of domestic violence.

Violence toward sexual orientation and gender identity minorities has always been a significant problem.  FBI and California Department of Justice statistics, based on reported hate crimes, have shown that sexual orientation as a bias motivation in hate crimes consistent ranks either second or third as the most common type of motive in hate crimes.  Traditionally, violent hate crimes committed against sexual orientation and gender identity minorities tend to be extreme.  Gay men and transgender women are particularly vulnerable. Data from the California Department of Justice and FBI in 2016 shows an increase in reported hate crimes.  Non-profit groups monitoring hate violence are reporting significant increases in hate violence directed at sexual orientation and gender identity minorities in 2017.  Law enforcement officers and dispatchers need to be aware of these trends in order to more accurately detect, document and investigate report hate crimes.  Existing California State law requires local law enforcement agencies to report to the California Department of Justice all reported hate crimes, but still some do not comply.  If the responding officer does not detect these crimes, they will not be reported correctly.

Law enforcement’s ability to respond appropriately to incidents of domestic violence and hate crimes directly impact trust from the community.  When ignorance and overt prejudice influence a law enforcement officer’s interaction with LGBTQ+ victims, trust in law enforcement is eroded.

Conclusion

The two UCLA Williams Institute studies referenced throughout this paper provide overwhelming evidence to support a requirement for law enforcement officers and dispatchers to receive training on sexual orientation and gender identity minorities.  The studies provide evidence supporting the five required areas of training specified in this legislation.  History has already demonstrated that unless this training is required by law, the law enforcement profession will not take action to provide this training on its own.

The goal with any training requirement, such as the one described in this bill, is to make law enforcement more effective and to give law enforcement officers and dispatchers what they need to be effective in serving the public and responding to calls for service.  Being effective here also means maintaining an inclusive workplace that is free from harassment and discrimination and one that doesn’t create a financial burden on public funds from the continuous payout of settlements for violations of employment law.

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